On National Parks and Monuments: When you visit these parks and monuments, remember that it is VERY illegal to remove any fossils that you might find. Instead, please mark the location of the fossils, report your find to a park ranger, and leave them for park paleontologists to study. Most museums, state and local parks or monuments have volunteer opportunities for all ages. What fun!
THIS IS ONE OF THOSE FINE PRINT KIND OF DOCUMENTS. STAY OUT OF TROUBLE.
I DON'T WANT THE M.I.B.S. (MEN IN BLACK SUITS) SHOWING UP AT MY DOOR WITH MY NAME ON A COPY OF THIS WEBSITE THEY FOUND IN YOUR FOSSIL EXCAVATION HOLE SOMEWHERE ON NATIONAL PARK LAND.
Laws and regulations established by owners or managing agencies of the lands on which they wish to collect. Prior to collecting, fossil collectors should determine ownership of the lands they intend to visit and familiarize themselves with the regulations that apply to collecting on those lands. The following information is valid as of 2005. Keep appraised of changes or updates. When changes occur, they will be posted here.
Permits may be required to collect on some government lands, and permission is required to collect on private lands. About 87 percent of Arizona's lands are managed by either federal government, the State of Arizona or is Indian Reservation. Much of this is presently open to collecting except for National Parks, National Monuments, American Indian lands, military reservations, dam sites, and wildlife refuges.
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Except where posted or on developed recreation sites, the casual collector may collect reasonable amounts invertebrate and plant fossils if collection is for personal, non-commercial purposes. Surface disturbance must be negligible. Collection of large quantities or for commercial purposes requires a permit from the BLM. (Commercial collecting of fossils is not allowed). Petrified wood may be collected for personal use up to 25 pounds plus one piece per day up to a maximum of 250 pounds per calendar year. Use of explosives and/or power equipment is forbidden. Collectors wishing to resell their petrified wood specimens must obtain a permit.
U.S. FOREST SERVICE (USFS) Fossil collecting on lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service requires a permit. Although collecting for personal use is allowed in most districts and permits are typically free, collecting rules vary. (Commercial collecting of fossils is not allowed).
STATE LANDS Most state-owned property is managed by the School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (Trust Lands) and a rock hounding permit is required to collect on these lands. A fee is charged for the annual permit. Rock- hounds may collect up to 25 pounds plus one piece per day, up to a maximum of 250 pounds per year. This permit does not authorize collection in areas where active mining operations are in progress or in areas that are leased for the mineral being collected unless permission is obtained from the lessee. The permit does not authorize collection on other state-administered lands, such as state parks. Commercial collectors must follow specific regulations and obtain a mineral lease or materials permit. For permits and fee information, contact the School and Institutional Trust Lands Administrations.
PRIVATE LANDS To access or collect on privately owned lands, collectors must contact and obtain permission from the owners prior to entering the property.
INDIAN RESERVATIONS Indian reservations are considered sovereign nations and subject in part to their own laws and regulations. While Native Americans are no more or less friendly, generous and accommodating than any other people living in the Southwest, for many reasons they have developed a rightfully-gained sense of proprietary on lands granted them in the 1800s. It is possible to obtain permits in some circumstances, and this is accomplished by visiting official tribal headquarters for the reservation. Generally entering on reservation land with the intent to collect anything is considered trespass, and most of the time you will be first "gently" asked to leave.

One of the best bits of advice that can be offered here at T-Rat.com is to get to know your local geologists, paleontologists and museum people; be sincere about your interest in fossils. By doing so, you may have the opportunity to work along side professionals and other experts both in the lab and in the field, and you may get to experience areas not normally open to avocational fossil enthusiasts.

"THERE IS SO MUCH BEAUTY IN THIS WORLD AND I JUST WANT TO DIG IT UP"

----author unknown

PLEASE OBEY ALL LAWS AND REGULATIONS SO THAT FOSSIL COLLECTING AREAS WILL REMAIN OPEN TO ALL OF US IN THE FUTURE.